ColetteB….

not exactly work in progress…


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Monday’s Mundane post (less than 700 words)

I caught sight of a photo post challenge response from Indira’s Blog earlier today and thinking I’d maybe take part, hopped over to check the Mundane Monday Challenge rules. Just my luck that this week has been declared the last week of that challenge, unless volunteer(s) step up to host it. After a whopping 150 weeks hosting the challenge, it is understandable that someone might need to draw a closing line and take some rest from it.

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silly text to input, forgetting the point


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Not in my wildest imagination…

Not in my wildest imagination would I ever have guessed that drinking less coffee for a few days trying to make the last jar last longer, then being deprived of coffee for three days until I could obtain groceries, would immediately result in my first insomniac phase of this last few weeks (while thoroughly physically exhausted and fairly incapable). Being ‘atypical’ / typically ME again…

a slightly abstract pencil drawing by Colette Bates in her 1995 art studies sketchbook, composed with angular lines depicting a hexagonal shaped head and upper body; the face has closed, eyes and a strange, weary expression.

drawing (mine) circa. 1995 – a page in my half-filled A6 sketchbook from art school days.

Not in my wildest imagination, back in 1995, would I ever have pictured my life as it is here and now, all these 23 years later! However, that is not the point of my making this post…

NB: potential trigger warning – if you are sensitive or in distress, you might not want to read some of my reflections and rants about the traumas of the world and persons. Nothing worse than you might see or hear in the news, perhaps – no image triggers but the text might remain highly-strung /over-wraught while i’m not well-practised editing my own writing yet and lacking somewhat in the field of objectivity, versus subjectivity that is. I have objects enough.

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Reading reflection

Notes on Reading Reflection

Notes on Reading Reflection (and my new microwave delivered yesterday that I’ve been learning how to use).

With thanks to Jane at Making It Write and Calen (Cherry) at Impromptu Promptlings for being such inspiring, supportive co-learning company. They’re also both great conversationalists as well as admirable, talented writers.

This is the first idea I had as a response to today’s writing101 task to expand on a comment. I’ve combined two seperate conversations via blog commenting from yesterday in making this post.

I thought I’d show Calen the book I referred to when we were discussing reading. For the quotes excercise I chose a quote from a book I’ve not read yet and we had a quick chat about reading and my writing. The book pictured above is the one I set myself to read recently. I got as far as the end of chapter 1 almost two weeks ago, promised myself I’d read some every day and still haven’t. Overdoing writing101 because I have to expel burning ideas and keeping up with challenges and blog-hopping as much as I can makes for quite a lot of reading already. I will settle down to reading some of this book later (I promise myself).

So that’s ‘Shoes Were for Sunday’, set in Glasgow, post World War One, from the times of the author’s childhood. (ISBN: 978-0-241-95792-9) The author, Molly Weir, was born in 1910. She was also the actress who played Hazel McWitch in the popular BBC children’s television series ‘Rent-a-ghost’. Does anyone remember that programme (late 1970s?1980s?) I’m probably showing both my age and unwillingness to distract by research and linking again!

This photo and post also fits with my conversation with Jane – she’d written a fantastic poem about her ‘thingymijiggy’ in the corner of her living room. My new thingamijiggy (microwave) is set up in the scullery corner of my living room. I’ve adapted the one room to accommodate both my sofa and living room furniture, my dining table in front of the window, used my tall wall units as if a dividing wall and have my fridge freezer, an old kitchen cabinet with worktop-top and a wooden kitchen trolley to use as my necessarily compact kitchen area. The kitchen makes a very good dog-run and shed, but is still used for occasional washing-up and laundry. Out of necessity.

Reflection in my new bargain price (less than £40) Tesco microwave in my compact kitchen area. Reflecting ...

Reflection in my new bargain price (less than £40) Tesco microwave in my compact kitchen area. Reflecting …

Among other reasons, the extra steps a long kitchen requires is often problematic at times of low health and poor mobility. While there are risks to my dog to have me using and dropping sharp things, hot things and other hazards, it makes it safer all round to improvise a small working kitchen area.

Jane, re: your wonderful poem,  I hope you understand my comment better when you see this post – Thank you also for inspiring my essay-writing this morning too! (by the way, the photo of my actual kitchen at the top of that essay page is cropped, also from a reflection in my new thingamijiggy… it’s coming in handy for culinary art and reflective practise today and for future use for sure.)

If you’re visiting from writing101 and you have a W101 post or poll you’d like me to check out, please live me a link in the comments below. Any other feedback or suggestions most welcome.