ColetteB….

not exactly work in progress…


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See if I care? Happy Easter Happy April Fools too :)

The inadequacies of words…

The misperceptions of ‘you MUST write according to your majority audience appeal and meet their WANTS’.

Bullshit. My background is as a contemporary artist, poet since childhood (and are we not all?) and happen to write. From a natural English perspective from a British Isles tradition and cultural heritage. As a European of course. That will NEVER change.

Legislative absurdities and conflicting political power-driven baloney cannot force the Anglich/English to conform and comply.

And really there is no need.

We are very socially responsible people FFS and some other folk around the global environments perhaps do not have the willingness or inclination or capacity of their formalist moulded intelligence to spare a moment to try and understand the meanings and multiplicities of even simple English words.

So I spend some effort and time battling with neurological ill health and disabling impacts and tremours and wonder, WHY might intelligent readers not:

SEE IF I CARE? That’s an invitation to let me know if you have any problem or issue with my writings. That way i can seek to improve my texts, or I can decide it’s just the individual’s problem and not an issue that I should tolerate as a creator. Otherwise bullying oppressors CONTROL your creativity.

I am not a puppet on a string.

I prefer not to upset people. However, i don’t mind losing readers if you don’t like my stuff. It’s personal creative space and even when I achieve health to return to professional work / job-related activity i will be writing exactly these same kinds of things in the same kinds of ways. It probably wouldn’t be my main/core product/service however. Just a natural path of the course, exploring traditions of language. The archaic has a profound place in contemporary writing, especially in art-writing. Intriguing to explore.

A British contemporary audience would be my immediate potential audience.

My texts might not be translatable to even foreign English language audiences sometimes. Then they shouldn’t be translated.

If I were writing for marketable audience product-driven projects (such as fiction) then of course I would or might be bearing in mind and paying attention to all those conventions and hopefully including an option to select an American language version for the comfort of potential readers – and for the excercise (and that word is to always have a second ‘c’ to be correctly spelt! Maybe I’m showing my age).

I guess some readers can’t understand that to truly study English Literature one must develop the patience and skills necessary to decipher strange looking texts to unpick potential multiplicities of meaning and arrive at contextual understanding and so on.

Formalist traditions were ditched long ago in our British culture.

We have been born and raised in a matriarchal society for well over a hundred years.

There are Grand Canyon size chasms in some differences of American and British cultures, despite the influx of mass-media offerings during our childhoods.

I love America too, but…

Trolling and hate speech and oppressive assertions in the name of equality are surreptitious, veiled in their appearances of politeness and correctness and overbearing and acts of atrocity. Minor ones in the grand scheme of things of course.

No idea what the meaning of removing my post title from my home page run is all about. perhaps it’s saying all kinds of things.

Risk management? I can’t find anything in my email or anywhere relating to any cause for concern or complaint issue to consider and respond to.

See if I care? Of course I do. And the reader is free to choose to take offence or not at misinterpreting any phrase that affrays their simple human mind. Thank goodness we all have one of those!

Happy days for us all, eventually and as soon as possible for so many others would be very nice to wake up to one of these days, wouldn’t it!

Thank you for reading. UK conventions insist you have no right to complain until you have approached the person to whom you have a complaint with.

I take full legal responsibility for my own original content as do we all when we choose to use our platform.

And since becoming sense makes no sense at all in the context of sentencing elsewhere recently, (crew? or crow?)) things like gramarly-dot-com are so totally unreliable and such a BAD idea. I am also entitled to assert my personal opinion.

Thank you Word Press. Maybe this post title action is only to hurry me along to ‘please pay for this one AS WELL’ and yes, as soon as possible, I will be! Linking to WARNING [DPprompt, yesterday…]

Happy Easter, Happy April Fool’s, Happy Howevers and Whatevers Whenevers etc. I apologise for feeling another piece of writing became necessary before I can move along nicely to the point of even arriving at what I set out to do YESterday.

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Authorstory – a quick discussion post

I should have remembered in this post to make clear: author Robert Olen Butler is an esteemed academic from, I think, Yale University, maybe another one of those ‘top’ institution type places – fact-checking= Florida State University – seemed quality while I listened in watching (youtube link for Inside Creative Writing Episode 1 of 17 here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vIcnmiT0Mc8) opens with mention of ‘intransigence of English language’, a noun meaning:
‘refusal to change one’s views or to agree about something’ (sourece: google dictionary). How very appropriate. I remembered his name spelt wrongly too, I’ll correct that asap.

Blogger's World!

I’d been hoping to maybe make an #authorstory post sometime this month and realised it’s the very last Wednesday of the month. I’ve not had the concentration or focus while busy with other things along the way of getting myself back to a blogging habit.

I’d wondered about writing about Enid Blyton (and then on how no-one’s ever raised J.K. Rowling but I prefer not to pry into knowledge of her bio and try and read her first two books instead seeing as I find I still have my eldest sons’s copies. I admire her in lots of ways but having made history with such a huge personal carbon footprint isn’t something i admire and seem unable to avoid mentioning and that’s not fair is it. I’m not really in a reading fiction phase quite often so that post would take me ?years?)

I’d be interested in writing about Stephen…

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“…general jerk-like behavior”

Apparently that phrase above is acceptable promotional language for the meet things running in UK the last year or two(?) dunno how long really, only noticed info recently. Looking at a couple of examples lately and I don’t feel I’m missing anything for none appearing to be held in my home city.

Of course people usually can be expected to behave in public environments but what we call British sense of humour appears potentially not tolerated too!

I don’t want sitting down in a classroom or a lecture hall for a WP meet with some professional twit enough to volunteer to give a presentation style talk as if it’s the Worker’s Education Association but probably isn’t and I just don’t like the look of the little I’ve seen so far without knowing enough to inform my opinion. Why not marquees on city / town squares on busy shopping days and if you’re around you can just drop in to someone’s table / display board like other UK community events work? Or lay on a creche / family friendly afternoon with free cookies and ice-cream with 99 red balloons being not enough or maybe much too many. Free-writing again. Nothing’s working.

Whatever it is – information to impart/promotion/participation expectation – you often have to TAKE it – to where people happen to be. Not expect them to go all out and attend. Sweeping generalisation there i know. And I’m being a jerk writing back to that prompt. Like that nottingham(shire?)council sponsored CUNT stunt displayed HUGE on slab square in the name of art for art’s sake and protest a few years ago. i did screenshot it so could prove it too. (Public CCTV grazing for art reason of reading in newspaper about artists working with data collection – triggered my screenshot stuff). I’ve not published it of course, the council copyright notice made clear. i’d be free to give it away on pieces of paper but it’s hardly worth trying. How impolite to suggest people need telling they gotta behave proper!

There are problems with setting things up to fail all over the shop. Although a pretty good turn out if you can get even 8 to 10 people in the same fixed place at the same fixed time in this country! So they actually looked successful by UK standards and i’m not knocking the volunteer organisers (who often tend to invite and encourage attendees from their own networking circles to help things look more successful than they really are so you never can be sure and it’s another issue that might or might not put me off) but if you can’t see public info enough on how they operate and there’s no public feedback at what went on at these things, why would you take any more out of your time to try contacting someone somewhere to wait to find out about it.

Unknown online organisations running the things? do they get a monopolised patch on a city/town territory? Or small-fry local, government funded, business organisations running the show? And British University support isn’t really a guarantee of anything these days is it. All our industries have been complaining enough for years about uni turn-outs and lack of skills. No wonder. Even standard school text books have too many incomprehensible moments in trying to read Americanised English and Americanised context so that it’s difficult to see what you need to understand from what should be  a quite simple page. i know. Look who’s talking springs to mind. Does this appear or sound like a text book page? This is not what I was trying to make. Should be obvious?

I’d rather any other non-professional blogging person in the world with the gumption to try doing something just got on with publically declaring, hey, we’re doing this and see how it goes – picnic on the beach on whenever the next Sunny Saturday afternoon is. Y’know, while all the yobbish peeps with kids ie. people/families! mostly are in the arcades and on the tatt markets and so on. (Awful thing to say I know!) Of course i’m as far away from the sea as a person can be living in this city, so that wasn’t a serious suggestion. Local rec. maybe?

Surely that quoted phrase ‘general jerk-like behavior’ is an example of the very thing it suggests is unacceptable (at one of those types of meetings)? Is that why it’s there? dark sarcasm. pink floyd fans maybe then.

It’s both potentially offensive to disabled / impaired people who might have tremors and so jerk about their everyday lives -and is also very offensive to our English language to use an American spelling of our behaviour!

Maybe I’m being pedantic. Maybe it’s contagious. There’s swarms of apparently very nice respectable ladies out there being very undignified and obnoxious twattin’ about as all sorts of professionals oppressing the hell out of humanity appearing to seek advantageous control of the freedoms of others by way of cleverly worded interpretations / misinterpretations. Many of it stemming from the US with their very different culture – the absolute cheek of some man you tubing bullshit about how British people identify more with america and australia than europe. Depends how you asked the leading questions chap if you got those results from survey data.

back to the Word. good. The Word is Good. Good God FFS! Does that pukey service gramarly have anything to do with that ‘behavior’ nonsense in that UK promotional blurb. Maybe. Not everyone realises it’s not English! I think when I checked they don’t actually have an English grammar service. only standardised American. Not all Americans use standardised AmEn grammar either. For most UK technology consumers it’s a foreign language service provider ie. for American language use. This standardised rubbish doing the rounds via software that wants you to put ALL your communications through it. And not even trial the service before signing up? There should be a law against it in this country! Appears shoddy business standard. I do wish my internet streams sucked in more European content. But…

I guess the US dominates the internet for being 20 years ahead of population integration to the web and lacking foundational computing knowledge. So less likely to understand the gubbins of software coding. Probably by design. Dominate the professions on our home soil. First they take over and refuse to leave at least one of our air force bases (a long time ago now) and stupid bloomin’ Brit government let them flood in with whatever dodgy money looking like tourists breaking any law they like maybe blowing stuff up and blaming Libyans cos the style changes of news items and details not presenting in usual ways just give it away – Britain under pressure – Buck.Pal. springs to mind… poisoning defectors from elsewhere (as per the BBC in news quote from an American based Russian scientist/defector clearly stating ‘this country’ about the full cycle of the poison use thing and by that meaning America, unless he was visiting Britain and was here saying Britain are responsible. i can’t be doing fact-checking just now. A lot of dodgy stuff going down. and on this post. I’m not apologising on this one.

And here I am potentially allegedly-able anti-Americanising again, conversationally, as is my right – and I might be wrong on a few things in this post but I’m clearly telling you I don’t know for sure do I! .and I am NOT anti-american until they’re rogue flippin’ I.S. /military hoodwinking and shittin’on our doorsteps. Good Morning Britain! Wake up! Some might say ‘you’re being a jerk!’Or we all are. Some might say all sorts. Whatever.

And it’s very intolerant of people who might appear awkward or disruptive but whom experience difficulties with communication, for example, and frustration with intolerant deliverers of however they do things with whatever bad attitudes a lot of so called professional people might have about the low-life turning up to get in on the action and so on. Obviously i know nothing about nothing. The phrase affrays. a simple phrase. (reminds me of my poem here i think!) Please don’t suggest I stick with poetry. Nor tar and pitch!

I’ll try keeping an open mind but not wasting any more than the few minutes I just distracted with. And you’d expect a WP group to not to expect you to join a facebook group as well as the WP group really wouldn’t you? I.e. a members private access area on an organisers blog for ease of access for WP bloggers is surely better for most people unless they use facebook more than being bloggers and just also happen to have a blog.

Surely they need Fb meets not WP meets if they’re about a different platform for their comms? I’m really not meaning to be this awkward battle-axe of a Brit grandma. i just can’t help myself. My generation’s all getting old but we bring our child-i with us as we age don’t we? and if you reach juvenile stage before adulthood you’re fortunate and retain some enough for when you gotta laff or else you’d cry. Some audience might not like it. And see if I care?

I’m waiting for a notification of a local virtual access version of a WordCamp type thing but I guess they only do these real world things regardless of the number of UK bloggers with accessibility issues for getting to real world venues. You can’t please all the people all the time is true. And unlikely I can get anywhere for ages anyway. Sounds stupid doesn’t it while we don’t need jeeps or guzzling monster trucks to drag ourselves hundreds of miles just to get to a diner and store if we’re lucky. y’know. Leaves on track. Bit of snow. Rainy day no out to play.

But a lecture type presentation is going nowhere fast for most Brit bloggers surely? I can understand why we’re unlikely to have anything as wonderful as the US WordCamps here – unless there’s a tent at Glastonbury or something.

But I’m not bothered about not going there either. Everywhere’s too far to walk! I went once. I’ll probably never go again, cos been there, done that, once is enough. Not exactly missing anything other than overpriced everything and the rain and the mudslides etc.

Music is everywhere. It’s horrible being at a festival with so many stages instead of just one main and maybe one or two smaller alternatives. It’s like being stuck in Disneyland Paris for four days unable to go to the Louvre for three of them (and actually had 0days at Louvre that time in Paris!) and then having had two rides one of them almost giving you a heart attack and not being able to enjoy anymore of the funfair while stuck in plastic toy land. But the animation museum was great and so was the sit back and look at starry skies show thing, can’t remember what you call it now. Doh!

This isn’t really a quote post is it! I just wanted to see what one looks like.

Lav. poem starter drafted in just now recital practise:

If you’re an inky-pinky and i’m an inky-punky / when-e’er the twain shall ne’er meet […tbc]

A.R.R. 2018

[writing201 for imperfect posts so adding to editing/extraction task pile – oh please not another stupidly long post… lol]

0642 BST / 0542 UCT/GMT waiting for breakfast to magic itself UP! [1894-1896 words. count. If it was history i wonder what happened?] 1904 getting off. NOW then. [1908 ‘The Other Side’ springs mind wieder. Again. [1915] [wc]

Must stop counting. [1919]


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Mundane Monday

I posted earlier in the month about aiming to join in the Mundane Monday photo challenge but finding it had just been announced that very week to be finishing. The challenge now has a new host and I decided I’d take part this week with a post at my other blog from where I hope to continue posting photos for this particular weekly challenge…

The Wishing Well

I just discovered today that the Mundane Monday photo challenge is continuing with a new host challenger so joining in this week’s challenge via: https://drkottaway.com/2018/03/19/mundane-monday-challenge-151-chairs-and-sun/

Maybe I’ll revisit this prompt on a better day for playing with the idea of ‘chairs and sun’, I was just too low-energy and lazy today for taking new pics – and hopefully I’ll get my archives organised better in the next few weeks because I’m sure I had taken a good sunny chairs photo somewhere – although if it was on my mobile phone that remains unfound.

Although this is a singular chair, hopefully the photo speaks with the subject ‘chairs’

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Monday’s Mundane post (less than 700 words)

I caught sight of a photo post challenge response from Indira’s Blog earlier today and thinking I’d maybe take part, hopped over to check the Mundane Monday Challenge rules. Just my luck that this week has been declared the last week of that challenge, unless volunteer(s) step up to host it. After a whopping 150 weeks hosting the challenge, it is understandable that someone might need to draw a closing line and take some rest from it.

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Time to rekindle my participation in milae’s Recycled Book Reading Challenge [1500words]

I’m way overdue for continuing this (and plenty of other previously planned blogging intentions). Never mind.

I’m still not managing linear reading well and struggle to retain what I’m reading as I journey longform, so dip in and out of stories rather than read from front to end. I’ve probably not finished reading any of the books I mentioned in any previous posts for this and definitely haven’t got as far as any writing on any of them.

The challenge host, milae has reviewed the book read during February and made an excellent post.

I’m beginning to think that writing book reviews is just way out of my league and so I’ll continue admiring in awe those more able and take part slightly differently. My efforts have always received warm welcome and I’ve missed doing this during absences.

Anyway, as I’m a scatty and sporadic reader, this month I hope to focus on four books pictured below).

arrangement of four books

Four books I hope to focus on this month

I’ll definitely be able to cope with starting and finishing the first book: ‘Our plane’ written by Beatrice Phillpotts and illustrated by Margaret Souza. It was first published in 1987 © Templar Publishing Ltd and first published in Great Britain by Macdonald and Co (Publishers) Ltd (also 1987).

This edition I bought in a bargain bookstore – for new surplus stock and cut-price books with plenty of print errors in some of them – so I probably bought this for my eldest child by about 1993 or thereabouts and it probably cost about 99p or £2 or less at the time. I’d guess for this kind of product in that type of shop (still trading today) the retail prices have probably remained quite similar even after all these years, but I haven’t been to town to recently to check that fact before writing this post.

back cover of the young children's book, 'Our plane' showing a boy and girl looking out of the window at a white bird, maybe a dove.

from the back cover of the young children’s book, ‘Our plane’

This edition (copyright 1987, as detailed in previous paragraph) was published in 1990 by Award Publications Ltd (London) and printed in Singapore. So boy did that book travel a long way and have a large carbon footprint. I don’t recall sight of any errors in the text though. I did however ponder upon how many times in the story I would feel a need to adjust my reading of the tale these days, if I were reading it to any of my grand-children. There seemed to be many sticking points along the way where I felt things needed rephrasing and were somehow less appropriate than i might have noticed as a young parent. It remains however a beautifully illustrated and well-told tale even if the characters are stereotypically: one boy, one girl, mum and dad, white family.

I have already re-read this story recently and have read it many, many times in the past with my children when they were young. I expect I must have added conversation about home safety with the reading of the story as two children play at making a plane by balancing a surf board across an ironing board to pretend it’s a plane and make an imaginary journey. Surf boards aren’t common household and leisure items owned by British families usually, so my guess is it’s an American story and I assume I realised that at the time I bought it. I can imagine myself leafing through to check the text for appropriate English spelling before buying. It has only universal English words where there would be no difference. What I didn’t notice at the time was the potential (small) racism contained in the story, in portraying desert people as ‘desert bandits’. I expect we talked about that while reading it too.

That’s not to say I won’t happily buy from American authors when I know it’s probably gonna be American English cos they can’t be bothered translating to proper English for their audience (or don’t know how and can’t afford translation costs) and as a reader I can just take a red pen and correct all the translation issues needed, explore meanings and make notes when I simply don’t understand what looks like the same language but sometimes isn’t. I suppose that’s what Americans do with our English, when they’re not trying to claim English as theirs (so ours is Anglisch is it? Well, if we’re descended from Angls, it could be…

As a paragraph previously track-pad-glitched to the-system, and I’m getting exhausted, I’m drawing a close here quite soon. Is what I was telling myself at that point.

Book number two, so far, is a fantastic book for children and an interesting easy-read for adults like me who just wanted to check for myself if it’s suitable reading before maybe passing it on or keeping it to read with grandchildren. First published in 1989, it’s cover price of £2.99 seems fair and it’s about what I’d expect to pay for a book of it’s small size (approx 130 pages, quite large print), even nowadays, although I sourced this from the fund-raising charity book sale quite a many moon ago now and I’d be happy if I paid £3.99 for it, as it seems very good quality writing. This is ‘Hippo Ghost’ by Lance Salway, ISBN: 0-590-13599-6 (I took the photo below of the front cover of the book and this shows my shadow over it. I like how that shadow fits with the subject matter of the story so far – I hope to manage reading this book through to the end during this month! – I also hope the author and publisher don’t object to my use of appropriative method, but my photo being low-resolution, illustrative, in context, and I assume Fair Use, as per all the images I’m using in this post. (As a personal, hobbyist blogger).

front cover of Lance Salway's Hippo Ghost, a book for younger readers - cover design overcast by my shadow as I took the photo

~~~~~~~~

The third book, Oliver Twist is from a collection of about eight retold classics, bought for my eldest, never read by him, nor my youngest nor any between. As I found when I unpacked them from their stuff from their childhoods being kept at my house, these books still appear mostly untouched. But even for me, trying to read and understand ‘Oliver Twist’, again it’s probably the same issue: American language. And it’s uncomfortable when the authentic English voice of the story is lost, although it’s ok in most parts, but it causes stumbling blocks and confusion. I’d seen these sets of books in the same bookstore as the first book, at knockdown price of £4.99, previous RRP £9.99, maybe during the mid-1990s; my eldest received these as a gift about twenty years ago. This adaptation is ©1969 and this edition quoting a 1988 copyright act; it states it was ‘Printed in India. Reproduced in the UK.’ I’m not quite sure what that means. Really? As there is a ‘no unauthorised act in relation to this publication or…’ stipulation and as I do not recommend this text for British children and have no due regard nor respect for this product whatsoever I am not giving any detail at all. Not for fear of that ridiculously unprofessional clause, but so as not to inflict those particular books upon any other British English reader. Does the Trade Descriptions Act not apply to publishing industries when generating such misleading sales to consumers in the UK?

I’ll be making  a separate post (elsewhere) sometime in the future, exploring the irony of this issue. If you are a Charles Dickens fan, you’re probably already aware of plenty of things I am yet finding to be interested in. The Gutenberg Project has many files pertaining to Charles Dickens and I assume most of them to be authentic texts but have already found one there that is so unlikely to be by THE Charles Dickens and has to simply be by an American author of the same name, so that was disappointing, but has to be expected really.

~~~~~~~

Finally, an old favourite, The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood. Until I picked it up again recently I’d have swore the first chapter was ‘Shopping’ and had completely forgotten the gymnasium scene. I read this several times but want to delve into the detail of the story again, particularly the ‘PRAYVAGANZA’ scenes, as I don’t remember those featuring in the film, but could be wrong. I aim to check it against the film eventually as I should still have the VHS in a box here somewhere. Another thing for the evergrowing endless toDo list.

I thought I first read this book during A-level class as a teenager back in the mid-1980s, but my copy here is from 1993 when I tried A-level Literature evening class (completed the book, not the class – the teacher objected to teaching non-English authors in English literature class and wasn’t giving it the attention it deserved, rushing through and deriding it. At the time I thought that was daft as the exam title was ‘Literature’ and not ‘English Literature’. I wasn’t incentivised to resolve childcare and transport issues to continue the class and obtain my exam. Anyway, the language used is British English style in the main and I never had any stumbling over variant English differences with this text.

Detail from back cover of Margaret Atwood's novel, The Handmaid's Tale ISBN 0 86068 866 6 with a quote from Conor Cruise O'Brien stating 'moving, vivid nd terrifying. I only hope it is not prophetic.'

Detail from back cover of Margaret Atwood’s novel, The Handmaid’s Tale ISBN 0 86068 866 6